Christina Broom: The Business of Postcards

By guest on 6 Jul 2015
Christina Broom with her postcards stall at the Women’s War Work Exhibition, 1916

Christina Broom with her postcards stall at the Women’s War Work Exhibition, 1916

Against the leading Edwardian women photographers, Broom’s entrée to postcard production stood out as a unique business venture. She turned to producing picture postcards just as they were becoming a popular cultural phenomenon. Although pre-stamped official government postcards had been available for sending messages in Britain since 1870, the picture postcard offered a product that was original, functional and commercial. Read the full postRead the full post

Christina Broom: Ceremony and Soldiering

By guest on 29 Jun 2015
Life Guards S. Raper, Sidney Crockett and William H. Beckham, 13 September 1915 © Museum of London

Life Guards S. Raper, Sidney Crockett and William H. Beckham, 13 September 1915 © Museum of London

Photography has played an important part in shaping public understanding of the world’s armed forces since the mid-nineteenth century. John McCosh (1805–85), a Scottish surgeon and amateur photographer serving with the East India Company’s Bengal Army, created what are currently believed to be the earliest photographs of British soldiers between 1843 and 1856, a period which included the Second Anglo-Sikh War (1848–9). Elsewhere, an unknown daguerreotypist photographed American troops during the American–Mexican war of 1846–8. Despite the obvious constraints of early technology, both photographers captured the combination of ceremony and soldiering that forms the essence of military life. Read the full postRead the full post

A Riot of Colour: Christina Broom and the Suffragettes

By guest on 22 Jun 2015

Young Suffragettes © Museum of London

Mrs Albert Broom took some of the best photographs of the brave women who campaigned for the vote in London in the years up to the outbreak of the First World War in 1914. One of the earliest of these images in the Museum of London’s collection is of the Suffragettes, members of the militant Women’s Social and Political Union, at their ‘monster’ meeting in Hyde Park on ‘Women’s Sunday’, 21 June 1908. Her last suffrage photograph captures the arrival of the Cumberland suffragists, members of the moderate National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies, ‘Women’s Pilgrimage’ to the capital on 26 July 1913.
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An introduction to Christina Broom

By anna sparham on 19 Jun 2015


In 1903, Christina Broom – Mrs Albert Broom, to use her professional name – propelled herself into the field of photography as a business venture to support her family. Rising from self-taught novice to a semi-official photographer for the Household Brigade, she emerged as a pioneer for women press photographers in the UK.

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International Archives Day 2015 #IAD15

By sarah madden, blog editor on 9 Jun 2015

 

Archive Shoebox  (tweet 2)

Archive Shoebox  (tweet 1)

What will you discover within the archive boxes?

 Today is International Archives Day! Though you might not know it, the Museum of London is home to several archives. Each contains a section of our mass of collections – stored for research and future displays. Much of it is stored inside quite plain looking boxes like this one, but looks can be deceiving…
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Friday fish fry: From Billingsgate to WWII whalemeat

By sarah madden, blog editor on 5 Jun 2015
The Super Fried Fish Bar, Soho, at night 1964, taken by Henry Grant

The Super Fried Fish Bar, Soho, at night 1964, taken by Henry Grant

Fridays have traditionally been synonymous with fish, thanks in most part to the Christian tradition of abstaining from meat on Wednesdays and Fridays, but it seems this Friday in particular has been dubbed (on Twitter at least) ‘National Fish and Chip Day’. Well, Londoners love a chippy and as a river city it’s no surprise that there are literally hundreds of fishy objects in the Museum of London’s collection. In a nod to today’s new Fish and Chip Day holiday, here are some of our favourites…

1. Bob Collins‘ photographs of Billingsgate Fish Market in 1958 Read the full postRead the full post

Volunteers’ Week: Skills Sharing

By claire madge on 4 Jun 2015

CCC pic 1

This week is one of my favourite weeks at the Museum of London, the 1-7th June is Volunteers’ Week, a celebration up and down the country of all those who give up their time to work for free. This week is all about sharing the hard work and achievements of volunteers as well as celebrating the contribution that we make to different organisations.

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Twenty Bridges

By beatrice behlen on 20 May 2015
Twenty Bridges video displayed on the LED ellipse

Richard Müller (centre) checking Twenty Bridges in the Museum’s Sackler Hall before the launch.

In spring 2015 the museum invited students at the Slade School of Fine Art to respond to the theme of City Now, City Future. The proposal of Canadian artist Richard Müller was selected. His video installation for the museum’s Sackler Hall, Twenty Bridges, presents an apocalyptic and at the same time playful vision of a future London consumed by the Thames. Submerged in the river, objects from London’s history mix with the debris of contemporary London life as the water reduces everything to flotsam. Read the full postRead the full post

Time for a reshuffle… Playing cards in the collection

By sarah madden, blog editor on 11 May 2015

Card-game-Evacuation

Card games have long been a traditional pastime of Londoners, and as our collection demonstrates, they often serve as a window into a particular period of history. In the spirit of today’s ‘reshuffle’, here are some of the card games and game inspired objects on display or in the archives at the Museum of London.
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Women swimming the Thames

By caitlin davies, author on 6 May 2015
Members of the Surrey  Ladies  Swimming Club

Members of the Surrey Ladies Swimming Club, courtesy of Ian Gordon

‘Swimming is the best sport in the world for women,’ so wrote legendary open-water swimmer Annette Kellerman in 1918. Thirteen years earlier, in the summer of 1905, she had arrived in the UK from Australia to make her international debut in the River Thames, covering thirteen miles from Putney to Blackwell. Read the full postRead the full post