The Pomegranate and the Rose: Henry VIII and Katharine of Aragon

By jackie keily on 29 Jan 2015

Livery-badge

In a case in the Medieval London gallery at the Museum of London lies a small pewter badge depicting a Tudor rose combined with a pomegranate. These were the heraldic devices of Henry VIII and his first queen, Katherine of Aragon. Katherine made only a fleeting appearance in the first episode of Wolf Hall on the BBC, but it was enough to remind us of the fairly tragic life that she led. Read the full postRead the full post

5 remarkable ways Sherlock galvanised CSI and forensic science

By shivani lamba, director of forensic outreach on 28 Jan 2015

Sherlock-forensics
“My name is Sherlock Holmes. It is my business to know what other people do not know.”
Arthur Conan Doyle, The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle

Stirring first in the imagination of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, a Scottish writer and physician, and eventually animated on the pages of his eponymous stories, Sherlock Holmes ascended quickly into our collective psyche as the ultimate detective — a veritable master of mental agility and a master at the art of deduction. Read the full postRead the full post

Another look at the London 2012 Cauldron…

By dominika erazmus on 19 Jan 2015

London Look Again artwork

This month you may see ‘London Look Again’ ads springing up across the rail network – and the keen eyed among you might notice that the artwork features some of the museum’s collections. We thought we’d look again at one item in particular – a copper petal from the London 2012 cauldron – and uncover other Olympic gems in the collection. Read the full postRead the full post

Who’s the best Holmes? Who’s the best Watson?

By sarah madden, blog editor on 19 Jan 2015

Many actors have taken on the iconic roles of Holmes and Watson, but who did it best? This January and February, we’re inviting Sherlockians to join in the debate and state their case. So, who’s your favourite?

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The Silvertown Disaster of 1917

By sarah madden, blog editor on 12 Jan 2015
A landscape after the Silvertown explosion, 25 January 1917 Silver gelatin print John Henry Avery,

A landscape after the Silvertown explosion by
John Henry Avery

It’s the biggest single explosion to have ever taken place on London soil, but the story of 1917’s Silvertown disaster is relatively unknown. Here Museum of London Docklands Curator, Georgina Young, uses maps and images from the Port of London Authority Archive to delve a little deeper into the unfortunate event, which claimed the lives of 73 local people and injured over 400. Read the full postRead the full post

The Journey of the Magi… from Cologne to London

By jackie keily on 29 Dec 2014
Detail from pilgrim badge depicting the three kings.

Detail from pilgrim badge depicting the three kings.

The 6th of January is the feast of the Epiphany, celebrating the visit of the Three Magi, Kings or Wise Men to the infant Jesus in Bethlehem, bearing their gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh. In medieval times this was a very important feast day, as it marked the twelfth day after Christmas and the official end of the Christmas period. This idea lives on in the tradition of taking down Christmas decorations by the 6th. Read the full postRead the full post