The broken sword and the vanishing bridge

By acollinson on 17 Oct 2016
An illustrated map of the Thames in 1901.

An illustrated map of the Thames in 1901.

In 1976, two museums were brought together to create the Museum of London: the London Museum and the City’s Guildhall Museum. This merged not just two museums’ collections but many years of files and records. This complex archive still has some fresh surprises left to discover. Let’s hear from John Clark, retired Senior Curator of the medieval collections.

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Bridging the Great Divide

By beverley cook on 8 Jul 2014

Bridge-image

As a child growing up in east London in the 1960s going ‘over the water’ was a rare event. For me the River Thames was a ‘great divide’ that separated me physically and psychologically from an area of London I had no reason to visit. Bridges bore no significance and appeared to stretch from my side of the river into the great unknown. Read the full postRead the full post

What’s your favourite London bridge?

By Andrew Marcus on 30 Jun 2014
Sir Peter Bazalgette launches Bridge at the Museum of London Docklands

Sir Peter Bazalgette launches Bridge at the Museum of London Docklands

On 26 June 2014 we celebrated the opening of Bridge at Museum of London Docklands. In his welcome speech Chair of Arts Council England, Sir Peter Bazalgette, asked our guests to vote for their favourite London bridge. Find out what our guests said below!  Read the full postRead the full post

Working in the dark: Fox Talbot and salt paper prints

By rose briskman on 23 May 2014
A rare Fox Talbot print showing Hungerford Bridge

A rare Fox Talbot print showing Hungerford Bridge c.1845

When I heard that a William Henry Fox Talbot photograph from 1845 was to be included in upcoming Bridge exhibition at the Museum of London Docklands, I felt a mixture of excitement and trepidation. Excitement that we even have such a rare and experimental photo in our collection and trepidation that the word facsimile would not be received well when I uttered it. Read the full postRead the full post