All salamanders great and small…

By sarah madden, blog editor on 26 Feb 2014

The Cheapside Hoard's salamander escapes onto the Museum of London rotunda

The eagle-eyed among you may have noticed two big, green, crawling new additions to the Museum of London’s iconic rotunda. Measuring 10 metres across, these reptilian beasts represent one of the most delicate and exquisite pieces of jewellery found in the Cheapside Hoard – a golden brooch, set with Columbian emeralds and Indian diamonds and speckled with intricately painted enamel. Read the full postRead the full post

Made in London designer profile: Husam el Odeh

By beatrice behlen on 9 Dec 2013

Husam el Odeh in his Hoxton studioWatch vest by Husam el OdehHusam el Odeh at work

London serves as a training ground, workshop, market place and inspiration to a large number of jewellery makers. Made in London: Jewellery Now explores the creations and unique vision of the most exciting, imaginative and boundary-pushing jewellers working in the capital today. In this blog series, exhibition curators Beatrice Behlen and Agata Belcen speak to the designers involved in the exhibition and discover what inspires them. Read the full postRead the full post

Coloured Gemstones: Standing the Test of Time

By katharina flohr on 30 Nov 2013

Fabergé green and pink multi coloured ringsFabergé spinel, emerald and sapphire ringsGold pendant set with emeralds and pink sapphires with a spinel drop from the Cheapside HoardEmerald watch from the Cheapside Hoard

Throughout history, fine coloured gemstones (emeralds, rubies, sapphires, amethysts, etc) have been more prominent and highly revered than diamonds and it is only in the last fifty years, following an extensive marketing campaign, that diamonds have become higher in demand. Read the full postRead the full post

Made in London designer profile: Rachel Boston

By beatrice behlen on 20 Nov 2013

Rachel Boston is one of seven jewellery designers profiled in Museum of London's 'Made in London: Jewellery Now' exhibition, which opens on 21 November. Part of The Museum of London’s Jewellery Season, the exhibition brings together seven London-based contemporary jewellers. Delving into the creative processes and working methods of the designers, the exhibition paints a picture of London as a source of inspiration and innovation. Beyond presenting their work, the exhibition explores the unique professional identity of each designer, giving a snapshot of their world and imagination.Jewellery by Rachel BostonRachel Boston's inspiration board

London serves as a training ground, workshop, market place and inspiration to a large number of jewellery makers. Made in London: Jewellery Now explores the creations and unique vision of the most exciting, imaginative and boundary-pushing jewellers working in the capital today. In this blog series, exhibition curators Beatrice Behlen and Agata Belcen speak to the designers involved in the exhibition and discover what inspires them. Read the full postRead the full post

The Cheapside Hoard: A spectacular find

By hazel forsyth on 27 Sep 2013

Gold finger ring from the Cheapside Hoard, 16th-17th centurySelection of necklaces from the Cheapside Hoard: 16th - 17th cenPendant reliquary in the form of a gold cross: 16th - 17th centuEmerald stone carved in to the form of a parrot: 16th- 17th centCheapside Hoard Copyright Museum of LondonCheapside Hoard Copyright Museum of LondonA gold, diamond and emerald hat ornament in in the form of a salamander.Jewelled scented bottle of white enamel and gold: 16th - 17th ceSelection of items from Cheapside Hoard: 16th- 17th century

Shoppers rushing along Oxford and Regent Street, bulging bags in tow, may not be aware that Cheapside was once the busiest and most renowned of all markets and thoroughfares in London. Once heaving with street traders, luxury merchants and goldsmiths, citizens flocked to its shops for everything from spices and haberdashery to silks, gold, silver and jewels.

It was here that a great treasure lay buried for almost three hundred years. Read the full postRead the full post