Heroism on display at the Museum of London Docklands

By acollinson on 22 Sep 2016
Richard Moore, George Cross winner, runs towards an exploding German parachute bomb.

Richard Moore, George Cross winner, runs towards an exploding German parachute bomb.

A new display at the Museum of London Docklands tells a story of extraordinary bravery in east London during the Second World War. Vyki Sparkes, curator of social and working history, and Nick Moore, son of the man awarded a George Cross for his heroism, discuss the medals and the man awarded them.

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Discover our new website

By spetty on 24 May 2016

The Museum of London website has had a makeover. As part of this we have changed where and how we display our blog content. You can still enjoy the same quality of in depth writing and curatorial expertise in the Discover section of the website.

What can you discover on the new site? 

Scenes of London: the photography of Dick Scott-Stewart

Punks on the King's Road, 1981 © DickScott-Stewart Archive/Museum of London

Punks on the King’s Road, 1981 © DickScott-Stewart Archive/Museum of London

Photography curator Anna Sparham shares her thoughts on the extraordinary variety of subcultures and scenes on display in Dick Scott-Stewart’s pictures of young punks and rockabillies, wrestlers and the people who watch other people from the audience. Anna is the curator of Stomping Grounds: Photographs by Dick Scott-Stewart, opens on 27 May, free to visit.

London Stone in Seven Strange Myths

London Stone viewed by Head of Archaeology Roy Stephenson and Curaror Emeritus John Clark  © Museum of London

London Stone viewed by Head of Archaeology Roy Stephenson and Curaror Emeritus John Clark © Museum of London

It’s been claimed to be a Druidic altar, a Roman milestone, and the magical ‘heart of London’. It’s one of London’s most ancient landmarks, but most people have never heard of it – or if they have, they’ve heard one of the strange legends that have sprouted up around it. Curator Emeritus John Clark (formerly curator of the Museum’s medieval collections) examines the myths and the colourful cast of characters who created them, from William Blake to an eccentric Welsh priest. You can see London Stone for yourself, on display in the War, Plague and Fire Gallery at the Musuem of London.

The Art of Flower Making

 

The Art of Flower Making: Wide brimmed hat, 1960s © Museum of London

The Art of Flower Making: Wide brimmed hat, 1960s © Museum of London

Senior Fashion Curator Beatrice Behlen and Curatorial Assistant Natasha Fenner discuss the surprisingly physical act of making beautiful artificial flowers by hand. These astonishingly detailed, hand-assembled flowers were used to decorate dresses, bonnets and hats, several of which you can see on display in the Show Space exhibition: The Art of Flower Making.

 

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Fire! Fire!

Opens 23 July 2016

The Great Fire of 1666 © Museum of London

The Great Fire of 1666 © Museum of London

Our first family focused exhibition at our London Wall site, Fire! Fire! offers families and interactive way to learn more about the history of the Great Fire of London. Visit the oven in Pudding Lane where the fire started and follow its path of destruction as you learn how the fire changed the physical make up of the city and things we now take for granted such as fire insurance and fire safety. Create your vision of the city and learn more about the plights of 17th century refugees. Find out more or book a ticket.

 

Explore our Mudlarks gallery at the Museum of London Docklands

Mudlarks Gallery © Museum of London Docklands

Mudlarks Gallery © Museum of London Docklands

Mudlarks is an interactive space for our younger visitors and their carers, introducing the stories told within the museum in a fun and stimulating environment designed to support children’s learning and development from babies up to 8 years old. Free, though a ticket is required. Book a ticket today.

From fish market to red carpet: The evolution of London’s Docklands

By james read, guest blog author on 18 Sep 2015
An electric trolley carrying tobacco, 1925

A man with an electric trolley carrying tobacco, 1925

London’s Docklands have gone through huge change in the last 70 years – from being one of England’s primary ports, to falling into disuse as cargo ships outgrew the Thames. It has seen vast industries come and go – the same warehouse that once stored tonnes of tobacco is now a dance floor, and what was once a 900 year-old fish market now hosts film premieres.

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The Silvertown Disaster of 1917

By sarah madden, blog editor on 12 Jan 2015
A landscape after the Silvertown explosion, 25 January 1917 Silver gelatin print John Henry Avery,

A landscape after the Silvertown explosion by
John Henry Avery

It’s the biggest single explosion to have ever taken place on London soil, but the story of 1917’s Silvertown disaster is relatively unknown. Here Museum of London Docklands Curator, Georgina Young, uses maps and images from the Port of London Authority Archive to delve a little deeper into the unfortunate event, which claimed the lives of 73 local people and injured over 400. Read the full postRead the full post

A haunted city

By faye kelly, visitor services manager on 7 Nov 2014

West-India-Docks-1900-crop

The people who live in this ever expanding metropolis walk busily from place to place, sometimes without so much as a passing thought for the environment they find themselves in. It’s particularly easy to do this within East London’s vibrant docklands. This modern area with its towering architecture is a financial centre for the city and home to a workforce of over 90,000 people. The once imposing warehouses of London’s past can easily go unnoticed by those hard at work in the surrounding towers. Read the full postRead the full post

The Great Dock Strike – 125 years on

By georgina young on 11 Aug 2014
Banner of the 'Amalgamated Stevedores Labour Protection league'

Banner of the ‘Amalgamated Stevedores Labour Protection league’


“The St. Lawrence is mere water. The Missouri muddy water. The Thames is liquid history.”  
So declared John Burns – a great advocate of London’s history – when asked to compare the Thames against those other great rivers in 1929. Forty years earlier in 1889 Burns had been a towering figurehead of the Great Dock Strike, thus sealing his own place in those murky waters. As the 125th anniversary of the strike approaches (14 August – 16 September) it feels an opportune moment to reflect on what this particular passage of liquid history might mean today.

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Down to the Docklands, you’re all out of options

By Andrew Marcus on 16 Jan 2014

Here at West India Quay, home of Museum of London Docklands, we’re always on the lookout for Docklands inspired art and music. So when we discovered East India Youth, named after the bit of Docklands musician William Doyle calls home (or so says the Guardian) our ears pricked up and we’ve been listening to new album Total Strife Forever since it was released on Monday.

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Excitement for Deutsches Haus at Museum of London Docklands as Games approach

By marketing on 26 Jun 2012
Museum of London Docklands will be closed between 9 July and 16 September to host Deutsches Haus, the official base for the German National Olympic Committee.  Activity will include Deutsches Haus, a private hospitality base, and Fanfest, a public celebration of German sport and culture. German-Sport Marketing tell us about the final preparations.

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