A night on the tiles with 18th century erotica…

By jackie keily on 3 Feb 2014
Curator Jackie Keily with 18th century erotic tile.

Curator Jackie Keily with 18th century erotic tile.

London has always been a hotbed for the seductive, saucy and down-right sordid. From the brothels of Roman Londinium and the stews of medieval Bankside to the Restoration Rakes and Soho’s swinging sixties, this city has long traded in the currency of sex. Erotic material – such as these relief tiles – was widely available in the 18th century, if one knew where to go and had the means with which to acquire it. Warning: explicit images in post! Read the full postRead the full post

Bottom heavy hazard

By marketing on 17 Oct 2012
Figs. 1 & 2 An example of where the base is detached from the walls of the coffin.
Figs. 1 & 2 An example of where the base is detached from the walls of the coffin.

 

Following on from Jill Saunders’ recent blog, The main event, the closing post in the series on the conservation of the iron coffin from St Bride’s looks at fixing the final problem of supporting the coffin base. Come and see the coffin for yourself in our Doctors, Dissection and Resurrection Men exhibition opening on 19 October. Read the full postRead the full post

The main event

By marketing on 26 Sep 2012
Fig. 1 An area of the preserved decoration featured on the exterior walls of the coffin, shown here at the head end.
Fig. 1 An area of the preserved decoration featured on the exterior walls of the coffin, shown here at the head end.

Following on from our recent blog post Coffin decoration & Mrs Campbell, Jill Saunders tells us more about the conservation work on the iron coffin from St Bride’s, focusing on the lacquering and consolidation of the main coffin. Read the full postRead the full post

Lacquering the lid

By marketing on 29 Aug 2012
Fig. 1 We fed the lid into the fume cupboard and used two Fumecubes to manage the harmful vapours from the solvent of the lacquer.
Fig. 1 We fed the lid into the fume cupboard and used two Fumecubes to manage the harmful vapours from the solvent of the lacquer.

Subsequent to Jill Saunders’ recent blog post, Name that fibre!, in this entry Jill covers the application of lacquer to the lid of the iron coffin from St Bride’s. Read the full postRead the full post

A few of my favourite photographs…

By other museum staff on 22 Aug 2012

This week Project Assistant Anna Elson posts her final blog on digitising the Museum’s collection of Henry Grant photographs. Well that’s it – almost 1,000 photographs have been uploaded to the Collections Online and I have come to the end of my work on the Henry Grant collection. Henry Grant was a freelance photographer working exclusively in black and white. Employed by a news agency on Fleet Street he photographed political events for the newspapers but also recorded scenes which he happened upon on his way to assignments. These are an eclectic mix of pictures including the sights of London, […]

Name that fibre!

By marketing on 9 Aug 2012
 Fig. 1a Interior: Coarse textile
Fig. 1a Interior: Coarse textile

Following on from our recent blog post, Turning over a new lid, Jill Saunders’ latest entry reveals how scanning electron microscopy analysis helped identify the different materials, both on and inside the iron coffin from St Bride’s. Read on to find out more… Read the full postRead the full post