Women swimming the Thames

By caitlin davies, author on 6 May 2015
Members of the Surrey  Ladies  Swimming Club

Members of the Surrey Ladies Swimming Club, courtesy of Ian Gordon

‘Swimming is the best sport in the world for women,’ so wrote legendary open-water swimmer Annette Kellerman in 1918. Thirteen years earlier, in the summer of 1905, she had arrived in the UK from Australia to make her international debut in the River Thames, covering thirteen miles from Putney to Blackwell. Read the full postRead the full post

5 remarkable ways the Victorians propelled CSI into the modern age

By shivani lamba, director of forensic outreach on 24 Feb 2015

Victorian scientific  equipment

Forensic Outreach are running a Sleuthing with Sherlock forensics workshop on Friday 6 March and 2 April between 7-10pm. To book tickets, head over to our website.

The macabre operating theatre in Southwark, the lined shelves of meticulously reserved human remains in the Royal College of Surgeon’s Hunterian Museum, and the earliest approaches to crime and punishment in the Crime Museum of Scotland Yard — these are the shadows of a bygone era in Victorian London. They are fascinating to behold, but we’re somewhat comfortable that their activities are now a preserve of the distant past.
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5 remarkable ways Sherlock galvanised CSI and forensic science

By shivani lamba, director of forensic outreach on 28 Jan 2015

Sherlock-forensics
“My name is Sherlock Holmes. It is my business to know what other people do not know.”
Arthur Conan Doyle, The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle

Stirring first in the imagination of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, a Scottish writer and physician, and eventually animated on the pages of his eponymous stories, Sherlock Holmes ascended quickly into our collective psyche as the ultimate detective — a veritable master of mental agility and a master at the art of deduction. Read the full postRead the full post

Unearthing the hoard: Mining for gemstones

By robert gessner on 17 Jan 2014

Coloured gemstone mining is mining like no other. This is so because all the mechanised mining and equipment that is used to strip the waste and expose the potential gem-bearing ore, is inferior to two of the greatest extraction tools in this world – a pair of hands. No piece of equipment can gently move this rock and forcefully chisel that rock to expose and extract some of the world’s rarest, most beautiful and sought-after natural objects. Read the full postRead the full post

Coloured Gemstones: Standing the Test of Time

By katharina flohr on 30 Nov 2013

Fabergé green and pink multi coloured ringsFabergé spinel, emerald and sapphire ringsGold pendant set with emeralds and pink sapphires with a spinel drop from the Cheapside HoardEmerald watch from the Cheapside Hoard

Throughout history, fine coloured gemstones (emeralds, rubies, sapphires, amethysts, etc) have been more prominent and highly revered than diamonds and it is only in the last fifty years, following an extensive marketing campaign, that diamonds have become higher in demand. Read the full postRead the full post

Guest blog: Shaun Leane and the hidden jewels of the Cheapside Hoard

By shaun leane on 15 Oct 2013
Shaun Leane, presenter of BBC4's 'Secret Knowledge: The Hidden Jewels of the Cheapside Hoard' © BBC

Shaun Leane, presenter of BBC4’s ‘Secret Knowledge: The Hidden Jewels of the Cheapside Hoard’ © BBC

Shaun Leane, award winning jewellery designer and presenter of BBC4’s ‘Secret Knowledge: The Hidden Jewels of the Cheapside Hoard‘ writes about London craftsmanship and the mysteries contained in the Cheapside Hoard. Read the full postRead the full post