The broken sword and the vanishing bridge

By acollinson on 17 Oct 2016
An illustrated map of the Thames in 1901.

An illustrated map of the Thames in 1901.

In 1976, two museums were brought together to create the Museum of London: the London Museum and the City’s Guildhall Museum. This merged not just two museums’ collections but many years of files and records. This complex archive still has some fresh surprises left to discover. Let’s hear from John Clark, retired Senior Curator of the medieval collections.

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Penny Toys and Poverty: Christmas in Edwardian London

By beverley cook on 15 Dec 2015

Christmas always provides us with an excuse to dig out from the stores objects relating to the festive season. This year, on display in our temporary Show Space until the beginning of January, are a few of our favourite Christmas things. These range from items related to the traditional Christmas entertainments of the pantomime and ballet to a collection of humble tinplate toys. Every one of these was imported from Germany and sold on London’s streets for a penny in the early years of the 20th century. Let’s see what’s inside the Museum of London stocking…

Penny toy from 1906- sweet container in the shape of Santa Christmas.

Penny toy from 1906- sweet container in the shape of Santa Claus.

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Anchors Aweigh! Family rave

By spetty on 11 Nov 2015

At the start of this year, the legendary club Plastic People shut its doors on Curtain Road in Shoreditch for good. It came among an ongoing wave of club and venue closures, and it was one of the smaller venues in London – fitting just 200 dancers – but it provoked a huge wave of nostalgia. This wasn’t just a sense of loss though: notable in all the tributes that were paid to the venue were an enormous sense of pride in the values of the club and how it represented all that is best about London and its people.

Flyer for a rave at the Hippodrome featuring a smiley face

Flyer for a rave at the Hippodrome , 1991 © Museum of London

 

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Kibbo Kift Unkovered

By guest on 16 Oct 2015
John Hargrave addressing  the Althing (annual camp), 1923John Hargrave addressing  the Althing (annual camp), 1923

Kibbo Kift Leader John Hargrave addresses the Althing (annual camp), 1923

Who were the Kibbo Kift?

Were they the pacifist and feminist version of the Boy Scouts? Were they banker-bashing radicals or performance artists? Were they, as some accused, secretly fascists, communists, or connected to the Ku Klux Klan? Now, for the first time in decades, this extraordinary and visionary social movement of the 1920s and 30s is back in the London spotlight.

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The Crime Museum Uncovered Reception

By blogadmin on 9 Oct 2015

On Thursday 8 October we welcomed guests to the private view of The Crime Museum Uncovered. The evening was opened by author and journalist Tony Parsons with speeches given by Sharon Ament, Director of The Museum of London, Clive Bannister, Chairman of The Museum of London and Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe, Metropolitan Police Commissioner and Helen Bailey, COO of MOPAC.

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The Journey of the Magi… from Cologne to London

By jackie keily on 29 Dec 2014
Detail from pilgrim badge depicting the three kings.

Detail from pilgrim badge depicting the three kings.

The 6th of January is the feast of the Epiphany, celebrating the visit of the Three Magi, Kings or Wise Men to the infant Jesus in Bethlehem, bearing their gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh. In medieval times this was a very important feast day, as it marked the twelfth day after Christmas and the official end of the Christmas period. This idea lives on in the tradition of taking down Christmas decorations by the 6th. Read the full postRead the full post

Scanner’s Sounds of London

By scanner on 21 Aug 2014

INternational artist, Scanner

If you were to type ‘sounds of London’ into a search engine you’ll find references to traffic, trains, the Tube, in effect the hustle and bustle of an animated city like London as you might expect. Then pause for a moment and think about what Thomas Dekker wrote about London in 1606:

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