Losing his head: John Schorn – an unofficial saint

By meriel jeater on 9 Jan 2013
Head from scorn badge

Head fragment from a John Schorn Badge

Over the last year I have been cataloguing the Museum of London’s amazing collection of over 700 pilgrim badges and souvenirs (that’s just the badges in the museum’s reserve collection – we have even more in our Archaeological Archive!). Read the full postRead the full post

The hidden history of the City wall

By meriel jeater on 15 Nov 2012

By Meriel Jeater, Museum of London Curator Here is a brief snapshot of some research I have recently undertaken to understand the evolution of London’s city wall. A section of the Roman city wall still survives in a garden outside the Museum of London. I mention these remains on my tours of the Roman fort gate, which still exist in a room next to the London Wall car park. It is sometimes tricky to explain to visitors why the wall, while having Roman origins, is made mostly from Victorian brick and includes two medieval towers. The short answer is that […]

Five things I’ve learnt from blogging about London

By star guest on 9 Oct 2012

By Michael Pollitt of snipelondon.com 1. London is infinite – There are so many people in so many places doing so many things. All of those people and places and things are potential blog posts. And the city is so big and so old that every street, and the history of every decade of every street, is a potential blog post. London is an infinity of interesting things. The hard part is choosing where to begin. 2. London has some great blogs – These other blogs aren’t competition, that’s not the way it works. If you’re talking about something that’s […]

Bone Books

By mike henderson on 19 Sep 2012

Hot off the Press….this month sees the publication of two brand new MOLA monographs invovling the work of the osteology team. Excavations at New Bunhill Fields, Southwark in 2008 uncovered evidence of a heavily used private burial ground. Documentary sources suggest that from c 1821–53 up to 33,000 burials may have taken place in the commercial Nonconformist burial ground. Excavation of 827 wooden coffin burials allowed comparisons of the use of the burial ground, coffin furniture and burial finds with other contemporary cemeteries. Of particular interest were the good level of preservation of floral remains in a child’s coffin, ceramic […]

Digitised Diseases

By mike henderson on 24 Jul 2012

  Since the beginning of 2012 the Osteology Department at MOLA has been involved in the Digitised Diseases project in collaboration with the University of Bradford the Royal College of Surgeons and funded by JISC. The ultimate aim of the project is to produce a web resource featuring high resolution 3D images of human bones with evidence of disease. Intended as a teaching tool, the website will allow detailed inspection of pathological lesions. Users will be able to move each image around in order to view it from every angle. They will also be able to zoom in to a high […]