Delivering the past: planning a plinth

By acollinson on 3 Oct 2016
Bronze age cooking pot, Roman amber gaming die and medieval token mould, on display in the Delivering the Past exhibition.

Bronze age cooking pot, Roman amber gaming die and medieval token mould, on display in the Delivering the Past exhibition.

A single archaeological site, excavated in 1975, provides a window into millennia of London’s past. Adam Corsini explores the fascinating former site of the General Post Office building, and explains how he designed the Delivering the Past display around it.

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Drawing on the collection: Illustration student Sam Bushaway

By spetty on 4 Dec 2015

In September, Sarah Castle (Higher Education Programme manager at the museum) was approached by BA (Hons) Illustration student Sam Bushaway, studying at the University for the Creative Arts, Farnham, who was about to start a project where she was required to spend time drawing on location. Sarah was interested in seeing how illustration might allow us to look differently at our collections, and what inventive interpretations might materialise. As well as working to a project brief which asked for work that was ‘visually unusual’ Sarah also asked Sam to consider whether illustration can change our perception of objects.

Here’s what Sam has to say about her time at the museum…

BA Illustration student Sam Bushaway from UCA (right) and Sarah Castle Higher Education Programme Manager at the Museum of London. © Museum of London

BA Illustration student Sam Bushaway from UCA (right) and Sarah Castle Higher Education Programme Manager at the Museum of London. © Museum of London

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Pilgrim badges and the birth of tourism

By james read, guest blog author on 26 Aug 2015
Curator looking at medieval Pilgrim Badges

Curator looking at medieval Pilgrim Badges

For centuries, tourism was a pursuit largely reserved for nobility. By the Middle Ages though, the rise of Christianity and success of the crusades saw a surge in pilgrimages across all classes, for religious salvation, to pray for relatives or simply to escape the misery of medieval life. This was the first time people were travelling en masse for reasons other than war, trade or industry – and was the beginning of tourism proper.

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Happy St George’s Day

By adam corsini on 23 Apr 2015

Happy St George’s Day one and all!

badge

 

St George’s story goes back to the Roman period and although his birth year is much disputed, most agree that his death occurred on this day, 23rd April, in AD303. But it’s the Medieval period when we start to see the saint’s image depicted on objects in our collection. Check out these 14th Century floor tiles found at Temple Church,Fleet street. Read the full postRead the full post

Henry VIII and the fickle hand of fate

By jackie keily on 3 Feb 2015

belt-chape

Last week I wrote about a badge in the form of a combined Tudor rose and Aragon pomegranate, commemorating one of Katherine of Aragon’s marriages to a Tudor prince, either Arthur or Henry. In the same display case as this badge in the Medieval London gallery at the Museum of London, there is another little remembrance of Katherine’s involvement with the Tudors. This object is a silver-gilt belt chape – a curved metal strip or edging that protected the end of a leather belt. Read the full postRead the full post

The Pomegranate and the Rose: Henry VIII and Katharine of Aragon

By jackie keily on 29 Jan 2015

Livery-badge

In a case in the Medieval London gallery at the Museum of London lies a small pewter badge depicting a Tudor rose combined with a pomegranate. These were the heraldic devices of Henry VIII and his first queen, Katherine of Aragon. Katherine made only a fleeting appearance in the first episode of Wolf Hall on the BBC, but it was enough to remind us of the fairly tragic life that she led. Read the full postRead the full post