Exploring the Roots of Roman Hairdos at the Archaeological Archive

By glynn davis on 13 Mar 2014
Roman Hairdresser

“So where are you thinking of going on your holidays this year…?”

The museum’s Archaeological Archive has a long standing reputation for involving volunteers in improving access to our archaeology collections. For the past year funding from Arts Council England has allowed us to develop an entirely new project, inspired by the museum’s Collections Online project, to digitally ‘open up’ our immense collection of Roman hairpins. Read the full postRead the full post

Name our Roman eagle and win some goodies!

By caroline mcdonald on 30 Oct 2013

Cliff Thomas, Chief Technician at the Museum of London, carefully places an extraordinary sculpture, depicting an eagle grasping a writhing serpent in its beak, in its display case. The Roman sculpture was discovered by Museum of London Archaeology and kindly loaned to the Museum of London by SWIP Property trust and Endurance Land.Technicians from the Museum of London carefully place an extraordinary sculpture, depicting an eagle grasping a writhing serpent in its beak, in its display case. The Roman sculpture was discovered by Museum of London Archaeology and kindly loaned to the museum by SWIP Property trust and Endurance Land.Julie Hawkes, Collection Care Technician at the Museum of London, dusts off the latest addition to the Roman gallery – an extraordinary sculpture, in the form of an eagle firmly grasping a writhing serpent in its beak, discovered by Museum of London Archaeology and kindly loaned to the Museum of London by SWIP Property trust and Endurance Land.

We’re thrilled to introduce you to a new temporary addition to our galleries, unearthed just 30 days ago on a City of London site by MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology). The best Romano-British stone sculpture ever to be found in the UK, this extraordinary sculpture is on display at the Museum of London for the next six months and in the form of an eagle firmly grasping a writhing serpent in its beak. Read the full postRead the full post

Bone Books

By mike henderson on 19 Sep 2012

Hot off the Press….this month sees the publication of two brand new MOLA monographs invovling the work of the osteology team. Excavations at New Bunhill Fields, Southwark in 2008 uncovered evidence of a heavily used private burial ground. Documentary sources suggest that from c 1821–53 up to 33,000 burials may have taken place in the commercial Nonconformist burial ground. Excavation of 827 wooden coffin burials allowed comparisons of the use of the burial ground, coffin furniture and burial finds with other contemporary cemeteries. Of particular interest were the good level of preservation of floral remains in a child’s coffin, ceramic […]

A day in the life of… Rachel English, Archaeologist

By meredith jones on 12 Jul 2011

Rachel is currently working on site at St Bartholomew’s Hospital, West Smithfield. Currently I’m employed as an archaeologist for Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA). I’ve recently moved from excavations at Three Quays House beside the Tower of London to work at the Barts site. The excavations which are taking place here at Barts are very different from those at Three Quays. This is the nature of archaeological sites and one of the main reasons I enjoy my job so much! No one site or excavation is the same. An archaeological site such as Barts can reveal occupation spanning from the […]

Visits to Stepney Green shaft site

By meredith jones on 11 Feb 2011

Beliz Tecirli, Assistant Contract Manager at Museum of London Archaeology, talks about the recent site visits for schools and local residents which she helped to organise at Crossrail’s Stepney Green site. Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA), together with Crossrail, hosted a series of site visits for schools and other local residents to view the important archaeological work taking place at our Stepney Green site before construction begins to build a ventilation shaft for the Crossrail tunnels. The aim of these visits was to engage the local community in the history of their local area and to promote the archaeology and […]

Shakespeare's First Theatre

By lucy inglis on 17 Sep 2010

In 2008, The Tower Theatre Company stood examining a plot of land in Shoreditch, wondering whether it would provide suitable accommodation for their troupe. Little did they realize another theatre company had stood there four hundred and sixteen years earlier thinking exactly the same thing, amongst them James Burbage and William Shakespeare. Both companies decided the site was ideal. The Tower Theatre Company called in MoLA (Museum of London Archaeology) to conduct the necessary works to establish what lay beneath the lighting warehouse that had occupied the site since WWII. Almost immediately, the team discovered what appeared to be the […]

An archaeological project in Jordan

By other museum staff on 5 Sep 2008

 In this guest post, Tony Grey, Finds Specialist at MoLAS, explains where he goes on his holidays.  He presents surprising parallels between the medieval sugar installation and ancient city at Zoara, southern Jordan, and London. Starting in 2006 and continuing this year I have been lucky enough to spend leave time working on an archaeological project in Jordan. I would recommend this way of spending some leave time to anyone from MoLAS. The project is based at two discrete sites near the village of Safi in southern Jordan near the southern end of the Dead Sea. The project was inspired […]

New pavement marks medieval church at St Paul's

By other museum staff on 8 Aug 2008

Dave Sankey, Senior Archaeologist for the Museum of London Archaeology Service, writes: “If you wander around St Paul’s Cathedral, you’ll see some curious modern pavements in the South Churchyard, opened this summer. The area has been landscaped following small “evaluation” trenches excavated by Robin Wroe-Brown and his team and a watching brief on the initial landscaping excavations by David Sankey and Aleks Cetera, with expert input by the then diocesan archaeological advisor John Schofield. The “new” pavement is a modern representation of the remains of the medieval church and illustrates the square cloister surrounding the octagonal chapter house.  [Image from the Telegraph […]

A Roman cellar and 'A' fragment of Roman glass at 20 Fenchurch Street

By other museum staff on 30 May 2008

Museum of London Archaeology Service excavations at 20 Fenchurch Street, London have uncovered a late Roman masonry cellar. A team of c. 20 MoLAS archaeologists were carrying out the excavations as part of a massive and complex redevelopment programme on behalf of Land Securities. The first phase of work lasted 15 weeks; a second phase is anticipated in the autumn, and a third phase will start in spring 2009. Site history In the Early Roman period, the site of 20 Fenchurch Street was probably occupied by a temporary fort, established to protect the city after the Boudican revolt. Later it […]