Foreshore finds: treasures from the Thames

By acollinson on 16 Jan 2017
A view of the Thames foreshore in Rotherhithe.

A view of the Thames foreshore in Rotherhithe.

The River Thames flowed through London before the city was even built, and its waters have swallowed up centuries’ worth of trash and treasure. The river is no longer the centre of London’s trade and transportation, but the objects excavated from the Thames foreshore provide a fascinating glimpse of the city’s past. Claire Madge talks about some of the relics rescued from the Thames, and her work to bring them to light while volunteering at the Museum of London Docklands.

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Discover our new website

By spetty on 24 May 2016

The Museum of London website has had a makeover. As part of this we have changed where and how we display our blog content. You can still enjoy the same quality of in depth writing and curatorial expertise in the Discover section of the website.

What can you discover on the new site? 

Scenes of London: the photography of Dick Scott-Stewart

Punks on the King's Road, 1981 © DickScott-Stewart Archive/Museum of London

Punks on the King’s Road, 1981 © DickScott-Stewart Archive/Museum of London

Photography curator Anna Sparham shares her thoughts on the extraordinary variety of subcultures and scenes on display in Dick Scott-Stewart’s pictures of young punks and rockabillies, wrestlers and the people who watch other people from the audience. Anna is the curator of Stomping Grounds: Photographs by Dick Scott-Stewart, opens on 27 May, free to visit.

London Stone in Seven Strange Myths

London Stone viewed by Head of Archaeology Roy Stephenson and Curaror Emeritus John Clark  © Museum of London

London Stone viewed by Head of Archaeology Roy Stephenson and Curaror Emeritus John Clark © Museum of London

It’s been claimed to be a Druidic altar, a Roman milestone, and the magical ‘heart of London’. It’s one of London’s most ancient landmarks, but most people have never heard of it – or if they have, they’ve heard one of the strange legends that have sprouted up around it. Curator Emeritus John Clark (formerly curator of the Museum’s medieval collections) examines the myths and the colourful cast of characters who created them, from William Blake to an eccentric Welsh priest. You can see London Stone for yourself, on display in the War, Plague and Fire Gallery at the Musuem of London.

The Art of Flower Making

 

The Art of Flower Making: Wide brimmed hat, 1960s © Museum of London

The Art of Flower Making: Wide brimmed hat, 1960s © Museum of London

Senior Fashion Curator Beatrice Behlen and Curatorial Assistant Natasha Fenner discuss the surprisingly physical act of making beautiful artificial flowers by hand. These astonishingly detailed, hand-assembled flowers were used to decorate dresses, bonnets and hats, several of which you can see on display in the Show Space exhibition: The Art of Flower Making.

 

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Fire! Fire!

Opens 23 July 2016

The Great Fire of 1666 © Museum of London

The Great Fire of 1666 © Museum of London

Our first family focused exhibition at our London Wall site, Fire! Fire! offers families and interactive way to learn more about the history of the Great Fire of London. Visit the oven in Pudding Lane where the fire started and follow its path of destruction as you learn how the fire changed the physical make up of the city and things we now take for granted such as fire insurance and fire safety. Create your vision of the city and learn more about the plights of 17th century refugees. Find out more or book a ticket.

 

Explore our Mudlarks gallery at the Museum of London Docklands

Mudlarks Gallery © Museum of London Docklands

Mudlarks Gallery © Museum of London Docklands

Mudlarks is an interactive space for our younger visitors and their carers, introducing the stories told within the museum in a fun and stimulating environment designed to support children’s learning and development from babies up to 8 years old. Free, though a ticket is required. Book a ticket today.