Christina Broom photographs the spectacles of London

By anna sparham on 13 Jul 2015
King George V, Queen Mary and Princess Mary, at a thanksgiving service at Guards Chapel, Armistice Day, 1918  © Museum of London

King George V, Queen Mary and Princess Mary, at a thanksgiving service at Guards Chapel, Armistice Day, 1918 © Museum of London

The London that Christina Broom knew and embraced as she embarked on her ventures with photography in 1903 would profoundly shape her ambitions, subject matter and way of working. Tradition, pageantry and ceremony, in keeping with the era, interweave Broom’s work. This might be deemed fairly conventional. Yet her compositions, approach and the access she determinedly obtained, indicative of this photographer’s strength of character, define and distinguish her images from the work of her contemporaries. Read the full postRead the full post

Christina Broom: The Business of Postcards

By guest on 6 Jul 2015
Christina Broom with her postcards stall at the Women’s War Work Exhibition, 1916

Christina Broom with her postcards stall at the Women’s War Work Exhibition, 1916

Against the leading Edwardian women photographers, Broom’s entrée to postcard production stood out as a unique business venture. She turned to producing picture postcards just as they were becoming a popular cultural phenomenon. Although pre-stamped official government postcards had been available for sending messages in Britain since 1870, the picture postcard offered a product that was original, functional and commercial. Read the full postRead the full post

Christina Broom: Ceremony and Soldiering

By guest on 29 Jun 2015
Life Guards S. Raper, Sidney Crockett and William H. Beckham, 13 September 1915 © Museum of London

Life Guards S. Raper, Sidney Crockett and William H. Beckham, 13 September 1915 © Museum of London

Photography has played an important part in shaping public understanding of the world’s armed forces since the mid-nineteenth century. John McCosh (1805–85), a Scottish surgeon and amateur photographer serving with the East India Company’s Bengal Army, created what are currently believed to be the earliest photographs of British soldiers between 1843 and 1856, a period which included the Second Anglo-Sikh War (1848–9). Elsewhere, an unknown daguerreotypist photographed American troops during the American–Mexican war of 1846–8. Despite the obvious constraints of early technology, both photographers captured the combination of ceremony and soldiering that forms the essence of military life. Read the full postRead the full post