Marvellous Miniatures at the Archive: Top 3 Tiny Roman Objects

By glynn davis on 24 Sep 2014

Roman miniature tear catcher

The Museum’s Archaeological Archive houses a vast collection of objects with sometimes intricate meanings and nearly always a hidden story. In our continuing effort to open-up and throw light on our stored collections this new series of monthly blogs will present an alternative ‘top list’ of London’s archaeological objects. Last month some of our unusual ecofacts made the line-up. This month were focusing on the superstitious Romans and some of their more unusual miniatures… Read the full postRead the full post

All that Glitters at the Archaeological Archive

By adam corsini on 17 Sep 2014

From Billingsgate excavations 1983From Royal Mint excavations 1986From Grimes' 1949 Fortgate excavations

Being an archaeologist sometimes comes attached with this idealised image of treasure hunting; we’re meant to find gold aren’t we? Well, the reality is that most of the time we’re just shifting soil and recording lines in the earth. However, not today! Because today is all about those rare instances when shiny stuff pops up and you get a little excited. Read the full postRead the full post

Big, Tiny, Broken: Top 3 Animal Remains at the Archaeological Archive

By adam corsini on 13 Aug 2014

A lumbar vertebra from a whale found during excavations at Vintry (VRY89)From excavations at the Fleet Valley (VAL88)From excavations at Lower Warbank, Keston (LWB67)

We’re all just a bunch of animals sharing this space called Earth. And we have been for a very long time now. Vertebrates, invertebrates, molluscs and sponges, being created, living and dying in a continuous circle of life. We’ve got them all at the Museum of London’s Archaeological Archive, from the very small to the shelf consuming. Here are three of our favourite examples of archaeological animal remains.

Read the full postRead the full post

The Object of this Blog? Find a Winner

By adam corsini on 7 Jul 2014


From 1969's excavations at Lefevre RoadFrom 1969's excavations at Lefevre RoadFrom 1981's excavations at Swan LaneFrom 1981's excavations at Swan LaneFrom 1981's excavations at Swan Lane

Object of VIP13 – Round 3

For the past week we’ve been pitting objects against each other to determine which has been the best of those worked through during the Museum of London’s 13th Volunteer Inclusion Project. Round 1’s winner was the sword/scabbard pilgrim badge and it is joined in the final with Round 2’s winner, which is…. Read the full postRead the full post

When objects get competitive…

By adam corsini on 1 Jul 2014

From 1971's excavations at Appian Road, Old FordFrom 1969's excavations at Lefevre RoadFrom 1981's excavations at Swan LaneFrom 1981's excavations at Swan LaneFrom 1981's excavations at Swan Lane

Object of VIP13 – Round 1

One of the favourite aspects of our Volunteer Inclusion Programme is that we come across loads of incredible artefacts spanning London’s history. And during our current project we’ve encountered some beauties. What we then like to do is get them battling it out, with you, The Great Blog Reading Public, helping to decide which is the very best. No real reason to do this apart from fun. So let’s get started.

Read the full postRead the full post

Making an Impression: Top 3 Foot/Paw Prints on Roman tiles

By adam corsini on 17 Jun 2014

 Child's footprint

I feel sorry for bricks and tiles. They sit on our shelves at the Museum of London archaeological archive alongside thousands of shiny, beautiful, sexy objects which scream out to be looked at and admired. But the brick? Well it’s pretty much a lump of clay. So how can they compete with the rest? Impressions. Read the full postRead the full post

Exploring the Roots of Roman Hairdos at the Archaeological Archive

By glynn davis on 13 Mar 2014
Roman Hairdresser

“So where are you thinking of going on your holidays this year…?”

The museum’s Archaeological Archive has a long standing reputation for involving volunteers in improving access to our archaeology collections. For the past year funding from Arts Council England has allowed us to develop an entirely new project, inspired by the museum’s Collections Online project, to digitally ‘open up’ our immense collection of Roman hairpins. Read the full postRead the full post