Christina Broom photographs the spectacles of London

By anna sparham on 13 Jul 2015
King George V, Queen Mary and Princess Mary, at a thanksgiving service at Guards Chapel, Armistice Day, 1918  © Museum of London

King George V, Queen Mary and Princess Mary, at a thanksgiving service at Guards Chapel, Armistice Day, 1918 © Museum of London

The London that Christina Broom knew and embraced as she embarked on her ventures with photography in 1903 would profoundly shape her ambitions, subject matter and way of working. Tradition, pageantry and ceremony, in keeping with the era, interweave Broom’s work. This might be deemed fairly conventional. Yet her compositions, approach and the access she determinedly obtained, indicative of this photographer’s strength of character, define and distinguish her images from the work of her contemporaries. Read the full postRead the full post

Have you seen this man?

By beatrice behlen on 11 Oct 2010

While improving the storage situation in some of the drawers in our Strong Room, Catherine, one of our Applied Arts conservators, found a number of rather lovely rosettes. She asked me to have a look at the objects as they all have NN numbers (is this a tautology, I wonder?). NN means ‘No Number’ and signifies that the original object identifier has been lost. Of course this kind of thing would not happen nowadays and mainly affects objects that came to the museum a long, long time ago. It is often possible to find the original number (I won’t go […]