New Exhibition – Street Cries: depictions of London's Poor

By lucy inglis on 23 Mar 2011

Ink Seller, c1759 by Paul Sandby © Museum of London From Friday the new Street Cries exhibition about London’s eighteenth century poor opens here at the Museum of London. The Cries refers to the different occupations of the beggarly street-sellers depicted, and the shouts they would have used to advertise their wares. Cries were issued by various artists throughout the century with varying degrees of success, and are meant to represent different types of people who dwelt upon the margins of Georgian London. As the urban population increased throughout the period, so did the fear of poverty and vagrancy and the nature […]

London Street Photography: a curators view by Mike Seaborne

By other museum staff on 28 Feb 2011

Today street photography is a vibrant part of London’s visual culture. It seems to reflect perfectly the diversity and controlled chaos of one of the most multicultural cities in the world. Contemporary street photographers are attracted by the endless supply of curious incidents and unexpected juxtapositions that contribute so much to London’s character. However, street photography in London is far from new. The first ‘instantaneous’ street scenes – those where traffic and people are captured in mid-motion – were taken in the early 1860s and by the 1890s candid street photographers with hand-held, and sometimes hidden, cameras were snapping Londoners […]