Women swimming the Thames

By caitlin davies, author on 6 May 2015
Members of the Surrey  Ladies  Swimming Club

Members of the Surrey Ladies Swimming Club, courtesy of Ian Gordon

‘Swimming is the best sport in the world for women,’ so wrote legendary open-water swimmer Annette Kellerman in 1918. Thirteen years earlier, in the summer of 1905, she had arrived in the UK from Australia to make her international debut in the River Thames, covering thirteen miles from Putney to Blackwell. Read the full postRead the full post

Vauxhall’s Pleasure Gardens

By sarah madden, blog editor on 18 Mar 2014
The Dancing Platform at Cremorne Gardens

Oil painting of ‘The Dancing Platform at Cremorne Gardens’

As London became more built up in the 17th and 18th centuries, Londoners began to need open spaces to relax in. Pleasure gardens were built at the edge of the city and were privately run with the most famous being the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens. Read the full postRead the full post

Victorian miracle cures and industrial age marvels: Tallis map advertisements

By jason webber on 14 Mar 2014
Steam powered coffee roaster - an advert from Tallis' Victorian Street Views.

Steam powered coffee roaster – an advert from Tallis’ Victorian Street Views.

With advertising running parallel with consumer society, it isn’t surprising that the advertising boom coincided with the Victorian industrial revolution. With newspapers and other printed materials the main source of information for Londoners, column ads were ubiquitous. Like any modern publication looking to turn a profit, publisher John Tallis looked to local businesses for advertising revenue. Read the full postRead the full post

Policing Victorian London: The Door to Newgate Prison and the Furnival’s Inn Watchman’s Box

By other museum staff on 29 May 2012

Following on from her blogs about William Raban’s film Nightwalks, the key objects within our Dickens and London exhibition, Dickens’ family portraits, and London pubs, this week PhD student, Joanna Robinson, looks at policing in Victorian London. Joanna is a PhD student working collaboratively with the Museum of London and the English department at King’s College, London. ‘And now the strokes began to fall like hail upon the gate, and on the strong building; for those who could not reach the door, spent their fierce rage on anything—even on the great blocks of stone, which shivered their weapons into fragments, […]

Following William Raban – is voiceover the future for Dickens adaptation?

By other museum staff on 1 May 2012

Inspired by William Raban’s film Nightwalks, currently showing in our Dickens and London exhibition, PhD student, Joanna, explores the implications of voiceover in retelling Dickens’ stories for a modern day audience. Joanna Robinson is a PhD student working collaboratively with the Museum of London and the English department at King’s College, London. Lurking in a dark corner of the Dickens and London exhibition, I bide my time. Ready at a moment’s notice to spring forth and pounce upon some unsuspecting member of the public, brandishing a questionnaire. William Raban’s film, The Houseless Shadow, is the exhibition’s final flourish and clearly […]

Views on Victorian London

By other museum staff on 17 Apr 2012

Inspired by our upcoming event at the Museum of London in which Sebastian Groes and Iain Sinclair discuss representations of Victorian London in 19th century literature, we’ve put together a selection of photographs which show the capital at the time. Click on each image below for more information. Taking these images into consideration, do you think the portrayal of Victorian London by Dickens and his contemporaries was realistic? Have your say in the comments section below or join us at the Museum of London on Wed 25 April (event details below). Darkest London with Iain Sinclair and Sebastian Groes Wed […]