From London Museum to the Somme

By acollinson on 18 Nov 2016
Maurice Edgar Read, London Museum typist (left) and secretary Harman Oates (right), 1911.

Maurice Edgar Read, London Museum typist (left) and secretary Harman Oates (right), 1911.

18 November 2016 is the 100th anniversary of the end of the Battle of the Somme- one of the bloodiest battles in human history, and one that has come to define our mental image of the First World War. Almost a million men were killed or wounded at the Somme, and one of them was the first employee of the London Museum, Maurice Edgar Read.

Meet Maurice – read more

Christina Broom: The Business of Postcards

By guest on 6 Jul 2015
Christina Broom with her postcards stall at the Women’s War Work Exhibition, 1916

Christina Broom with her postcards stall at the Women’s War Work Exhibition, 1916

Against the leading Edwardian women photographers, Broom’s entrée to postcard production stood out as a unique business venture. She turned to producing picture postcards just as they were becoming a popular cultural phenomenon. Although pre-stamped official government postcards had been available for sending messages in Britain since 1870, the picture postcard offered a product that was original, functional and commercial. Read the full postRead the full post

A brief history of Smithfield

By alex werner, head of history collections on 26 Mar 2015

Painting of 'A Bird's Eye View of Smithfield Market taken from the Bear and Ragged Staff'

Smithfield is one of London’s special places. Its lanes, alleys and courts on the edge of the market still follow a medieval street plan. Smithfield has its own distinctive character and feel. The bumarees or market porters with their white coats and hats, often smeared with blood, mingle with office and hospital workers. It is a locality at work both day and night. In the evenings, crowds spill out from the pubs and bars, while drivers park lorries laden with meat ready for the early morning market. Read the full postRead the full post

The Silvertown Disaster of 1917

By sarah madden, blog editor on 12 Jan 2015
A landscape after the Silvertown explosion, 25 January 1917 Silver gelatin print John Henry Avery,

A landscape after the Silvertown explosion by
John Henry Avery

It’s the biggest single explosion to have ever taken place on London soil, but the story of 1917’s Silvertown disaster is relatively unknown. Here Museum of London Docklands Curator, Georgina Young, uses maps and images from the Port of London Authority Archive to delve a little deeper into the unfortunate event, which claimed the lives of 73 local people and injured over 400. Read the full postRead the full post

From bunnies to hot-cross buns: Top five Easter inspired objects

By sarah madden, blog editor on 19 Apr 2014

River egg

For many Londoners, this weekend is all about a sunny pub garden, parks and chocolate binges. However, not forgetting the reason behind the Bank Holiday, I’ve searched through the online collections to bring you a bitesize list of our top five Easter objects. Read the full postRead the full post